January 6, 2010

The DL

No, not the Down Low, silly people. Well, not quite. The Diabetic Low, and yes, people should know... (it's a song reference, for those who don't know).

One thing to understand is that every low is different, and while we (the non diabetic folk) may be used to them and know how to handle them (grab the meter, find the glucose tabs, figure out what to use in place of orange juice - maybe sugar water will work?? Oh, and don't forget to turn off the damn insulin pump), we too have to handle them different every time.

I mentioned previously that I have had to call the paramedics on more than 1 occasion. It's not a form of weakness and doesn't mean it the current low was/is handled wrong; it is what it is and it's the way that specific low was handled at that specific time.

Sidenote: As most couples do, we (Mike & I) have our own little 'pet' sayings; basically our own little terms of endearment. Think of this as a teenager saying "I hate you" or "You're a dork" to their parents. My parents (hopefully most parents) think of that as "I love you" or "You're the best". Anywho, one of my husbands little sayings is "Get you" & "Kick you". But don't worry, it's not violent - please don't call the diabetes spousal abuse support group. Remember - Term of Endearment.

My point is that when these little phases become real and your own safety is at stake, paramedics have to be called in; as in the time when my husband wanted to kick me out of the window of our bedroom. Did I mention that the bedroom is on the second floor of our house?? This was the first time to the house.

Some may say, "I don't have to worry about that, I can handle my other half," then you've never experienced the power of an uncontrolled D-lifer. Good for you, consider yourself lucky. I hope you never have to experience that. But there may come a point when you do and when that happens, good luck...

The 2nd time was more recent, this time there was no kicking or swinging of the arms, just a somewhat conscious boy whose meter said 21 and after 10 minutes of honey, the meter said low... Why did I not use glucagon you ask, because I didn't. There are many reasons for this, too many to explain why. But the coherent one, me, choose not to use it and that should be reason enough. But the boys in the red fire truck came and all ended up being right with the world.

I know how my husband acts when he's on the DL, just as you know how your other half acts when their going through the DL. You do what you have to do to keep yourself and them safe. Notice how I said keep yourself safe first - remember that if you're injured because of them, you may not be able to help them the next time or may think twice about it, possibly wasting some precious time.

I hope my 'rant' makes sense. I tend to jump around in my thoughts sometimes. It's a flaw but it makes me lovable :)

I guess my point is that you handle the DL the best way you can and don't let anyone tell you it was wrong. If that's the case, let them be the ones to get hit in the face and you can keep your pretty, unblemished face smiling, while thinking "Told you so..."

BTW - Thanks to Kerri @ sixuntilme for the use of the low blood sugar photo that I borrowed from her site. Kisses, love your blog!!


  1. Suzi-

    you are right we deal with lows differently, can be mean or sometimes we can be called the devils child. Lol I love my hubbu and he knows I don't mean anything I saw when I'm low.

  2. I also makes a big difference if the D-person is 5'6" and the spouse is 6'5" or the D-person is 6' and the spouse is 5'4". How you handle it and who you call is very different. The bigger non-D can control much more in the smaller D than the other way around.

  3. Yes, I'd like to avoid the DL, Hopefully the Dexcom CGMS will help achieve that goal.

  4. Started reading your husband's blog first, and followed the link to yours. Sounds like you have been through some scary times. I am grateful that my Type 1 hubby doesn't get "physical" with me when he is low, but often does scream unrepeatable things at me when too low or too high. Be careful, and hang in there.